Historic Euro Uzbekistani som

Euro uzbekistani som history for July 2023. The highest quote for this month is 12993.8 (18/07/2023) and the lowest 13019.7 (18/07/2023). The difference between high and low is -0.2.

EUR UZS average rate for July 2023 is 12769.34286, the change between 01/07/2023 and 31/07/2023 is -2.02 %.

03 July 20231 EUR = 12452.70 UZS
04 July 20231 EUR = 12582.80 UZS
05 July 20231 EUR = 12532.50 UZS
06 July 20231 EUR = 12517.60 UZS
07 July 20231 EUR = 12524.20 UZS
10 July 20231 EUR = 12559.10 UZS
11 July 20231 EUR = 12706.40 UZS
12 July 20231 EUR = 12725.70 UZS
13 July 20231 EUR = 12905.40 UZS
14 July 20231 EUR = 12996.80 UZS
17 July 20231 EUR = 12932.10 UZS
18 July 20231 EUR = 13001.90 UZS
19 July 20231 EUR = 13014.30 UZS
20 July 20231 EUR = 12986.90 UZS
21 July 20231 EUR = 12885.60 UZS
24 July 20231 EUR = 12873.70 UZS
25 July 20231 EUR = 12844.30 UZS
26 July 20231 EUR = 12802.00 UZS
27 July 20231 EUR = 12862.00 UZS
28 July 20231 EUR = 12746.30 UZS
31 July 20231 EUR = 12703.90 UZS

25/02/2020: Introduction of New Large Denomination Banknotes

Uzbekistan introduced new 100,000 and 200,000 som banknotes to meet the requirements of the growing economy and reduce cash circulation.

08/02/2019: Exchange Rate Unification

Uzbekistan unified the official and black-market exchange rates, allowing for more transparency in currency transactions.

03/09/2018: Denomination of Uzbekistani Som

Uzbekistan announced a 1:10,000 denomination of the som, as part of ongoing currency reform.

05/09/2017: Floating Exchange Rate Regime

Uzbekistan transitioned to a floating exchange rate regime, allowing the Uzbekistani Som's value to be determined by market forces.

13/07/2015: Greek debt bailout agreement

A third bailout deal was reached between Greece and its creditors, avoiding a potential Greek exit from the Eurozone.

02/05/2010: Greek debt crisis

Greece's financial crisis threatened the stability of the Eurozone, requiring massive bailout packages to prevent a default.

15/10/2008: Global financial crisis

The Euro faced significant economic challenges following the collapse of Lehman Brothers, leading to a recession in many Eurozone countries.

01/05/2004: Eurozone expansion

10 more countries joined the Eurozone, bringing the total number of participating countries to 24.

01/01/2002: Euro banknotes and coins

Physical banknotes and coins in Euro were introduced, replacing national currencies in 12 European countries.

10/03/2001: Introduction of New Uzbekistani Som

Uzbekistan introduced a new som, with 1 new som equaling 1,000 old soms, as a result of currency reform.

01/01/1999: Introduction of the Euro

The Euro was officially introduced as an electronic currency for banking and financial transactions.

01/07/1994: Redenomination of Uzbekistani Som

Uzbekistan redenominated its currency, with 1 new som replacing 1,000 old soms to combat hyperinflation.

01/07/1993: Introduction of Uzbekistani Som

Uzbekistani Som (UZS) was introduced as the official currency of Uzbekistan after the country gained independence from the Soviet Union.

07/02/1992: The Maastricht Treaty

The treaty was signed, which officially established the European Union and laid the groundwork for the creation of the Euro.